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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

309: The Science of Policing, 11/15/2019

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | :00

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Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2019-11-08 California’s Story: How Did It Get Here?

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:59

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California has long been on the frontlines of environmental protection. These days, however, the state is also on the frontlines of a destabilized climate, careening between record drought and extreme rainfall, while its largest electric utility shuts off power to more than a million residents to avoid more damage from climate-amplified megafires.

“We’re gonna see havocs that have never been created before,” says Mark Arax, author of The Dreamt Land: Chasing Water and Dust Across California. “We’re going to be showing the way for the rest of the country, and so I think it's important to pay attention to what California is doing right and wrong.”

Calfoirnia has been showing the way since the mid-19th century, according to David Vogel, Author, California Greenin’ How the Golden State Became an Environmental Leader.  

“Beginning in the 1860s by protecting Yosemite, [California] has long been on almost every dimension the environmental leader in the United States,” says Vogel, who cites auto emissions regulations, energy efficiency for appliances, energy efficient building codes, and coastal protections as initiatives that began in California and spread around the country.”

But can the state’s legacy of environmental leadership save it from the effects of recent weather whiplash? Diana Marcum won a Pulitzer Prize for her series of articles on California’s central valley farmers during the drought. Years of parched weather have taught her to appreciate the green times we do get.

“I think that’s one thing I took away from the drought,” Marcum recalls. “During it I kept thinking, I wish I would've paid more attention.  I wish I could picture the snow.  I wish I could picture the grass.”


RELATED LINKS:

California Greenin’ How the Golden State Became an Environmental Leader
The Dreamt Land: Chasing Water and Dust Across California
Satellites in the High Country: Searching for the Wild in the Age of Man
Scenes from California’s Dust Bowl (Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times)
California Institute for Water Resources
Resource Renewal Institute
Sierra Magazine

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Beside Myself (#1535)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

2839023335_1268af6c77_w_small In response to our conversation about how to handle swearing in high-school classrooms, a longtime teacher shares a strategy that works for her. She insists that anytime students want to swear in her presence, they should instead say the words Moo Cow.
 
Carol from Falmouth, Massachusetts, is curious about this bit of wisdom from her father: As you travel through life, whatever your goal, keep your eye on the doughnut, and not on the hole. The Mayflower Coffee Shop chain, based in New Jersey and New York in the 1920s and 1930s, had a similar slogan. Word historian Barry Popik has collected other versions, including Between optimist and pessimist, the difference is droll. The optimist the doughnut sees, the pessimist the hole. An earlier version: As you ramble through life, Brother, whatever be your goal, keep your eyes upon the doughnut and not upon the hole.
 
Some proper names could also function as verbs. For starters, there's Grant, Bob, Josh, Mark, Chip, and Sue.
 
Gabriel Ray from Virginia Beach, Virginia, wonders about the history of something his grandfather used to say in a shoulder-shrugging way: Everything's duck but the bill. The origin of this phrase is unclear, but it's similar to a couple of old proverbs: Nothing ruins a duck like its bill and A wise duck takes care of its bill both serve as warnings to be careful with the things coming out of one's mouth, or metaphorically, out of one's bill.
 
The old-time radio performer Fred Allen had some great one-liners, such as Hanging is too good for a man who likes puns; he should be drawn and quoted. He also said I like long walks, especially when taken by someone who annoys me. Among his most profound observations: A human being is nothing but a story with skin around it.
 
Quiz Guy John Chaneski's puzzle involves subtracting the names of Greek letters from sentences. For example, the name of which Greek letter could be removed from the following sentence to leave another English word? I piled my gear on the horse that was in front.
 
Gina from Athens, Texas, wonders if there's any rhyme or reason to the names we give to the denizens of a particular place. There are a few general rules for creating demonyms, the names applied to the denizens of a particular locale. George R. Stewart, a professor at the University of California Berkeley, has written extensively on the topic of municipal onomastics, including the books Names on the Land and American Place Names. But there are so many exceptions to any general rules for how demonyms are formed that your best bet is simply to memorize them.
 
The giant statues of Easter Island are called moai. They're the subject of a Nova/National Geographic special about who those statues might have been moved into place. The technique that islanders used to move them may have involved tugging at ropes tied around the statue and extending out opposite sides. The statues could then be moved by tugging from alternate directions and "walked" the way you might move a heavy object like a refrigerator. The indigenous term for this technique is neke neke, which translates as "walking with no legs."
 
Jimmy and his high-school classmates wonder about the pronunciation of words like zooplankton, zoology, and zoological. The traditional pronunciation for many scientific terms that start with zoo- is to use a long o rather than an oo sound. The reason stems from the fact that the original Greek roots for these words use two different Greek letters -– omega, which is a long o, and omicron, which is a short one. These days, though, the word zoo, short for zoological garden, influences the way lay people pronounce those words.
 
Peter in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, asks how the expression I'm beside myself came to mean "upset" or "unsettled." The phrase suggests an out-of-body experience and came into English in the 14th century via a French translation of the Aeneid.
 
Science historian Cecelia Watson's splendid new book Semicolon: The Past, Present, and Future of a Misunderstood Mark is her long love letter to an underappreciated punctuation mark.
 
Marian in Norfolk, Virginia, says a character in the new Downton Abbey movie uses the term swag meaning either "bunting" or "stuff," and wonders if its use in the film is a linguistic anachronism. In fact, swag was used with both those meanings long before the early 20th century, when that story takes place.
 
Matt, a new college grad in Austin, Texas, wants guidance about what kinds of things are appropriate to share during conversations in the workplace. Sociolinguist Janet Holmes has extensively researched and written about communication in the workplace.
 
Suzanne in Williamsburg, Virginia, but grew up in Southern California, where she used the term go-aheads for the rubber-soled shoes that other people call flip-flops or rubber thongs or zoris.
 
This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Mx101 Ep76: The Wrecking Crew, 11/14/2019

From KUNC & The Colorado Sound | Part of the Music 101 series | 57:01

Music_101_recent_small The Wrecking Crew, a name coined by member Hal Blaine, were a group of session musicians who played on more songs than any other session musicians. Featuring the talents of Glen Campbell, Hal Blaine, Carol Kaye and many more, this episode of Music 101 will highlight some of their tremendous contributions to music.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR105: OHR Presents: Songs out of Style, 11/25/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Steel_wheels_sandlin_gaither_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, songs out of style performed by various artists recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Songs can transcend musical styles and those styles can also transcend their traditional songs.  “Songs out of Style” explores the movement of great songs, both old and modern, across musical genres.  We’ll hear traditional songs made new again, and modern songs remade in the old ways.

Artists featured on “Songs out of Style” include bluegrass sensation The Barefoot Movement, experimental acoustic ensemble Jayme Stone & The Lomax Project - featuring Moira Smiley, amazing sibling duo The Vogts Sisters, renowned traditional music explorers Anna & Elizabeth, internet star & hammered dulcimer Jedi Ted Yoder, mountain dulcimer world champion Jeff Hames, mountain dulcimer guru & musical mad scientist Bing Futch & Co, Red Wing Roots Music Festival founders & old-time supergroup The Steel Wheels, as well as old-time music masters, comedians, and all-around hooligans The Hogslop String Band.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a very young Ozark original, Dwight Moody, performing the song “In the Pines,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.  “In the Pines” is a traditional American song that was remade into a modern hit in 1993 by the grunge rock band Nirvana as “Where Did You Sleep Last Night.”

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater explores the peregrination of a song, following the journey of traditional song “Loving Hannah” from Ireland to America and back again.  Aubrey presents various artists’ versions of the song including herself, Mary Black, Carrie Norris, and Jean Ritchie with her son Jon Pickow.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 19-46: Food Science History With NCSU And Meal Prepping With Jackie Bea, 11/15/2019

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 29:01

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“Science is trial and error, and the scientists and engineers will tell you the failures are just as important as the successes, ‘cuz it tells you– now you know what not to do.”

On this week’s show we dive into the food science archives at North Carolina State University and uncover some strange experiments...atomic peanuts, anyone? 

Jackie Bea Howard shares a meal prepping recipe for a colorful bowl featuring gingered meatballs, and Moroccan flavors. 

And Harvest Public Media reports on emergency managers testing plans on what to do if the African Swine Fever were to hit the US pork industry.


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio (Series)

Produced by Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

334: Pasta Grannies: Lessons from Italy’s Pasta Masters, 11/14/2019

From Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio | Part of the Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio series | 53:59

Msl_radio_logo_cobrand_prx_small Vicky Bennison takes us behind the scenes of Pasta Grannies, her YouTube channel that documents Italian grandmothers making pasta the old-fashioned way. Plus, Robin Russell Gaiser tells us about her years-long endeavor of asking perfect strangers to lunch; Alex Aïnouz attempts to make a 1-million layer puff pastry; and we serve up Portuguese-Style Sweet Potato Rolls.

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

546: Development Arrested, 11/16/2019

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | :00

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With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Giving Birth While Black (Half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 28:59

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Black women are three and a half times more likely to die in childbirth than white women. Even highly educated, wealthy African Americans are at a greater risk than whites. To combat the disparity, Dr. Rochanda Mitchell advocates hiring more African American nurse educators and providing anti-bias training for medical professionals.


Plus: Bellamy Shoffner was well aware of the frightening statistics when she gave birth to her sons. Shoffner is Founder and Editor of Hold The Line Magazine, about social justice motherhood.  

 


Are We Alone?

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:59

If there is intelligent life beyond Earth, how would that change life ON Earth?

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News that life might exist or have existed on Mars or somewhere else in our universe excites many. But should we really be happy to hear that news? What are the philosophical implications of the possibility of extraterrestrial life? If life can blossom in our own cosmic backyard, then that means that the universe is most likely saturated with life forms. And if that’s the case, why haven’t we found any evidence of other civilizations? Is it because all civilizations are prone to suicidal destruction at a certain point in their development? If so, how might we avoid this fate? The Philosophers search for life with Paul Davies from Arizona State University, author of The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Space Passion from Carolyn Porco and the Transit of Mercury

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

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The outspoken planetary scientist who led the Cassini imaging team finally sits down with Mat Kaplan for a revealing, fun conversation. We also talk with astronomer Jay Pasachoff while he watches tiny Mercury crawl across the face of the Sun. Chief scientist Bruce Betts was in the Planetary Society parking lot enjoying the November 11th transit of Mercury.  He joins us from there for What’s Up. Hear much more of Carolyn Porco and learn about this week’s topics at:  https://www.planetary.org/multimedia/planetary-radio/show/2019/1113-2019-carolyn-porco.html

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

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Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 11/08/2019

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Lp5_small This week on the show: Planes, Trains, Automobiles - Lower prices helped democratize air travel, but flying is one of the most carbon-heavy actions a person can take. We look at Sweden's No Fly campaign, take a journey on a night train and visit a city in Spain that is mostly car free.

Tara Austin

From KUMD | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
KUMD

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 191117 11PM: ClassicalWorks (Episode 109), 11/17/2019 11:00 PM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 58:58

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 109)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse LLC

Most recent piece in this series:

1614.3: Jazz with David Basse 1614.3, 11/15/2019 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse LLC | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 59:53

Jwdb_small Jazz with David Basse

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

In Hoffa's Shadow

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 53:30

Hoffa_small Jimmy Hoffa will never be found, and won’t be forgotten either. What was it about the Teamster tough guy that’s more compelling 45 years after his perfect-crime murder than in his larger-than-life career? He was a working class hero when a third of American workers belonged to unions, the top of the labor ranks despite his open marriage to the Mob.  Jimmy Hoffa’s place in memory is right out of the movies: out of The Godfather and the golden age of the Mafia; out of Goodfellas when order was breaking down; out of The Sopranos’ modern melancholy for  a lost era—brutal, corrupt, all of it, but connected with a myth of mid-century masculinity. Was it something about a take-charge guy whose orders got followed?

Jimmy Hoffa is a fixture in American mythology by now. The two-fisted Teamsters’ leader who vanished in 1975 in a murder plot that left not a trace of hard evidence. Still a mystery, still mesmerizing, Hoffa’s a story that Martin Scorsese can tell one way this fall in yet another big movie, The Irishman, and that a Harvard law professor out of Hoffa’s extended family can tell very differently. Jack Goldsmith is our source this radio hour: in effect he’s the step-son of Jimmy Hoffa’s step-son—with his own history inside the federal justice machinery that was part of Jimmy Hoffa’s downfall. Jack Goldsmith’s book about his step-father Chuckie O’Brien is In Hoffa’s Shadow. Call it a fathers-and-sons love story inside the Hoffa epic, with a cool hindsight on Mafia power and FBI performance in the story, and second thoughts on the Kennedy brothers’ rough, righteous war on Hoffa the man. 

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions H46: Taxonomy Of Pleasure with Tammi Brown, and Joshua Redman Plays Chamber Music With Brooklyn Rider

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Lost_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, Taxonomy Of Pleasure - - that's the title of a new album from The Lost American JazzBook featuring singer Tammi Brown - -  or perhaps now "Lost American JazzBook II" as it says on the album   - -  with contributions from guitarist Stanley Jordan and violinist Mads Tolling.  Lost American JazzBook is the brainchild of writer & director Albert Greenberg and jazz pianist Dan Zemelman. We'll hear several songs, including a Bob Dylan classic, quite transformed, from them. Also: saxophonist Joshua Redman and his trio with the progressive chamber ensemble Brooklyn Rider, extending our notion of chamber music for sure, and Todd Marcus leading his band on a new album playing the rarely heard bass clarinet. We also have Teodross Avery in concert paying tribute to John Coltrane with a song Trane didn't write but famously performed, and a piece from the debut album of vibraphonist Lolly Allen.

promo included: promo-H46

Blue Dimensions G43: A Trinity Of "Presence"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Three recent albums all entitled "Presence," from Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, John Petrucelli, and Brad Whitely.

Evans_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we are surprised to note that three jazz albums entitled "Presence" have come out in 2018, and we've decided to draw music from all three of them - - one from pianist Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, some high-energy stuff recorded in concert at two jazz clubs in Philadelphia, one from pianist Brad Whitely, a strong studio recording, and another live one, a double album from saxophonist and composer John Petrucelli with lots of strings and a scallop shell used as an instrument as well. Three engaging and very different albums, all called "Presence," coming up in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: promo-G43

Feminine Fusion (Series)

Produced by WCNY

Most recent piece in this series:

S04 Ep11: All Together Now, 11/16/2019

From WCNY | Part of the Feminine Fusion series | :00

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Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWF 19-08: Bachfest Leipzig, 11/18/2019

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:57

Thomaskirche_02_small Under the slogan "Court Composer Bach," this year's festival highlighted works written when Bach was engaged at various courts. The opening concert from the Bachfest pits three of his most popular works against music by Charpentier.

High Country Celtic Radio (Series)

Produced by High Country Celtic Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

High Country Celtic Radio 086 - Veteran's Day

From High Country Celtic Radio | Part of the High Country Celtic Radio series | 59:00

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This week, Katie and Joe pay homage to the U.S. holiday, Veteran's Day, by playing songs and tunes about the young men who went off to war as soldiers and sailors, as well as about those left behind. Since the lands of Ireland and Scotland had been involved in wars for centuries, there are an overwhelming number of songs to choose from, so Katie and Joe focused mostly on the recruiting and conscripting.
This week, we play The Fire, Andy M. Stewart, Kathryn Tickell, Planxty, Great Big Sea, Molly's Revenge, Shay Black, Charlie Piggott & Gerry Harrington, Goodwin and Gray, Usher's Island, Celia Ramsay, Arcanadh, and Guichen

406: Celebrating the Birthday of Bucky Pizzarelli, 1/1/2019

From KCUR | Part of the 12th Street Jump Weekly series | 59:00

(Air Dates: December 31 - January 8) On this week's archive episode of 12th Street Jump, we celebrate the music of Bucky Pizzarelli with Bucky himself and his long time music partner Ed Laub. We'll play a game of "So, What's Your Question" with Ed and talk to Bucky about what gives him the blues.

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Public Radio's weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, 12th STREET JUMP celebrates America's original art form, live from one of its birthplaces, 12th Street in Kansas City. That is where Basie tickled and ivories and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues. Each week, host Ebony Fondren offers up a lively hour of topical sketch comedy and some great live jazz and blues from the 12th STREET JUMP band (musical director Joe Cartright, along with Tyrone Clark on bass and Arnold Young on drums) and vocalist David Basse. Special guests join the fun every week down at the 12th Street Jump.

Latin Jazz Perspective (T-5)

From Tony Vasquez | Part of the Latin Perspective - Latin Jazz Hour (weekly) series | 59:01

A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.

Yvettei_small A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.
This week edition is a special presentation on the Latin Jazz Flute.
Featuring Latin /Latin Jazz flautists from the past and present who where a major force
in the historical continuum of the music.

Notes from the Jazz Underground #44 - Jazz in Chicago, 2019

From WDCB | Part of the Notes from the Jazz Underground series | 58:00

With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.

Nftju_logo_small_small With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.